What Do You want?

I hope this helps the comment section of your own blog posts

Then blowing wet spring snow streaks the picture.

Turning from the newspaper touting the spring and summer clothing lines and swimwear “now in a store near you”, I glanced outside and muttered to Buddy the dog, “They sure don’t know what I want.” Buddy just whined and looked out the patio door wanting to play on the back deck in the 4″ of new snow. I stopped and took a “Buddy view” picture.

Buddy View picture out the patio door. 12″ predicted in next three days, but melting as well.

I opened the laptop and browsed emails. I noticed a comment from the last blog; a fun one as Nancy said “Your responses to commenters are every bit as insightful as your posts, Gary!” I sure appreciate that kind of comment because it means I might actually be connecting with total strangers that are getting less and less strange as we interact after the post. By the way, side note…yes read Nancy’s “Turnings” for a great way to present depth to a great insight”

Others have said similar things and I have always wanted to address this layer of blogging that many writers miss out on (possibly on purpose), thus my question “What Do You Want?” This question cuts past questions like “why do I write?” It goes for what you, in all your writings, are hoping to gain by posting your articles.

Bloggers often present swimwear in a snowstorm, to a percentage of readers; It’s the nature of strangers writing to strangers. If you want to know what turns your readers crank, strike up a conversation with them; either in your comment section or theirs. Tactfully. Tastefully. Come alongside and talk on whatever the comfort level they have with you (not necessarily you with them). Perhaps a friend in the making. Surely we can find some common ground with a quarter of the audience?

Yep still snowing outside. I need snow pants and a better shovel, not a swimsuit!

Think of going to class and listening (or not) to a nice, thought through, short, good, great, or boring and wordy lecture (whatever you decided to read). You usually do one of three things. 1) Go talk to the presenter, ask questions or make statements 2) leave without saying a word to anyone 3) hobnob with anyone or everyone else hanging around the perimeter and get to know some folks. One and three are the comment sections of a blog. There are perhaps dozens of blogs I will not go back to as the presenter doesn’t visit their own comment section. When they do it’s a smile and wave (click “like”)

So, what do I want? I want to share my pictures and life’s insights. I want to create conversations leading to friendships with some of the worlds most awesome people around the globe (you). I want to be a part of your next best seller or just help you get through chemo as a sideline encourager. I want to hear of your camping and hiking experiences and the storms you have encountered and survived. I want to see you face to face and be continuing this conversation a hundred years from now!

I know; bloggers are as plentiful as snowflakes and most of us make at least a small difference in this world.

One more thing, present to us readers something we can comment on. None of us are the beginning and the end as that position belongs to God. It’s a learned art to present an idea, insight, story, meanings and encouragements and turn the microphone back toward the audience. It’s a learned and practiced skill to be vulnerable without painting a target on yourself. Boldly top off your blog with uplifting comments that come alongside if possible. Don’t be like the cowboy riding off into the sunset without saying a word; us horses don’t want that!

Gary

Be a Buddy

Um, Why is the snow back???

Published by Gary Fultz

Outdoors Man, Hunter, Fisherman, Guide, Writer / Author, Photographer, Public Speaker, Musician, Song Writer, Story Teller, Follower Of Jesus. Love God and family and total strangers

97 thoughts on “What Do You want?

  1. I like to leave a comment if something strikes me, the words popping into my head. Lots of times I leave a Like or ❤ as my way of saying "I see you, but I'm overwhelmed with no other words or too many words in my head." It's a lovely view. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Judy. I sure understand. A whole lot of things can be happening as a person is reading someone’s blog. Sometimes one little tiny thing in a post strikes us. A picture or a phrase…sometimes nothing, Personally I like to find ways to respond to others comments in a meaningful way…hopefully

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Normally I’d leave 🙂 but I just can’t. LOL! I do enjoy the interaction with people I otherwise would never meet. It’s my reminder that computers, even when they annoy me, are so cool.

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Wynne. I hear very little about paying attention to one’s own comment section. To me, the comment section is the meeting in the foyer after church or the hallways after a concert or game. It’s where the words are weighed that were just read and we find out if the dots were connected by the readers, and if so how well connected and if there should be a sequel and so on. I personally like epilogues.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I love that statement “I personally like epilogues.” Yes, it’s where we build community instead of just launching our words into space!

        And you’re right – not many people talk about it. So glad that you did!

        Liked by 2 people

  2. “It’s a learned and practiced skill to be vulnerable without painting a target on yourself.”
    Never felt that way with you, Gary. Long as I ‘ve known you I always feel free and easy around you. Maybe I feel too free sometimes. Ha. Hope not. Ahh… you got me talkin’ when I been out of it all day. Good one, ol’ friend! 🌝

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s Ok Deb, I take my turn at the two as well. Your encouragement along the way has been great though. I don’t think there are more wrong answers than right as everyone will answer the question “What do you want out of blogging” differently. Some deserve a much bigger comment section even though it takes a massive amount of time to really engage. I just post when I feel I have time to engage for awhile.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Good answer. Buddy likes the snow, for awhile. My kids in Kentucky are begging for Buddy to come visit them when we go next month. If I understand Buddy correctly, he wants a small dogsled to pull for the quarter mile to the lake and back (it will hold my fishing gear I think).

      Like

  3. Hi Gary, I agree about taking the time to get to know people. Actually some of the warmest moments I’ve experienced with Christians, exchanging thoughts back and forth, has been in the blog comments section. It’s often like sitting around a table in the kitchen, enjoying one another’s company, and realizing that in so many ways, we are all the same. Or, in the settings you frequently present, around that evening campfire after a successful fish fry! That would be wishful thinking on my part! Real down to earth people, reaching out to one another. All good stuff that warms the heart. Blessings!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Bruce, I have a running list that keeps getting longer of who should be around for a good campfire discussion. You have been on that list for a long time. You keep honing your perspective with God’s word without trying to change it to your own thoughts.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I haven’t read anything you have written, Gary, that wasn’t well said and thought-provoking. I like the way you tied the ways people respond to a speaker to the way that many respond to a blog. Sometimes I don’t get any “likes” on my blog, and I am OK with that. The reason is simple, some of my readers are local and I see them from time-to-time. They tell me in person how my writing was helpful. That is always a sweet sound to someone who hopes they are helping others. Thanks for writing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank You Wayne. Your blog is literally a “wealth” of information. You have much wisdom beyond the investment world and in the spiritual realm as well. It would be interesting to know what percentage of bloggers write, post and read to expand their relationships well being rather than their knowledge base. After posting for 10 years I am convinced relationships are very high…however, if you put your knowledge in book form you could make a lot of money marketing to the investment 101 crowd. Just a thot.

      Like

    1. Ya, Buddy is a good listener unless there is a bird or a leaf blowing or a distant crow cawing. I have explained many things but Buddy, well, is just going to be Buddy. He would attack a bear for me…well not for me but because his eyes are bigger than his stomach and he thinks he could win.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Agreed, Gary. Writing a good post is like putting out the welcome mat for one’s readers. Striking up a respectable and thoughtful discussion is the goal. It is disheartening to post an appreciative comment and get little or no response. I have gained many insights from your comments. Here’s the latest: “Safe prayers are dangerous.” I have a potential post rattling around in my head based on that one.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That’s a good one to work on David. I sure appreciate your stories and insights. That future post should go two ways because “safe” from a Jesus perspective was walking on water and sleeping while the boat is sinking. Safe from our perspective is Jonah going the wrong way on the run….I bet you have a whole different slant, can’t wait..

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I like this insightful post. As you said, it goes beyond the question “Why do you write (or blog)?” Those interactions in the comment sections can be so satisfying, and yes, friendships across the keyboards are made. I make comments as long as I mean it sincerely. If I read a post and nothing comes to mind, I’ll give it a “like” if I do like the post, and let it go without a comment. If I have something to add, I do. If I disagree on some point, I will usually word it carefully so as not to offend or cause the writer to be defensive. I always respond to comments left on my posts, and I try to do that before too much time has passed. For me, bottom line is to be positive and sincere.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Your interactions are insightful Betty. You do great! I think you have a well balanced approach to commenting. Let’s face it, not all posts read will lend themselves to a comment. Some writers seem less approachable. Positive and sincere goes a long ways and is respected by most. one of the tools in my bag when I disagree with something is to ask a “clarification” type question if I feel the author is open to that kind of discussion starter.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I am glad this was helpful. I think I blogged for a couple years before I started thinking about what results I wanted in a blog…The result of being accepted into a community of strangers becoming helpful friends is really quite amazing over time.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Erroll, don’t overthink what I said. I’m not sure it’s that deep…lol
      It’s a bit like boxing, only you leave little openings to get hit (hopefully gentle playful hits) thus comments come.
      Maybe it’s more like this: writers are like musicians; you can get them to play your instrument (comment) by not finishing the song, or not completing a chord, or stuttering on the timing or leaving the song open-ended. they can’t not help you finish or fill in a spot or resolve the issue better. Writers are word and thought crafters…they must. I suppose another way to get comments is to be the class clown…
      What you present Erroll is very much worth reading. You say a lot in a few words.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Excellent word, Gary. Getting “comments” and engaging with readers is one of my favorite things about blogging. You’re right about giving readers space to make a comment. I agree, it does take skill and effort to “turn the microphone around.” Thanks for this, brother.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Rainer. You being “ministry minded” do well in the foyers, hallways, byways and alleys of the comment sections of life as well as blogs. Turning the mike around just kind of happens sometimes. For me, it started when I was an 18 year old teaching the adult Sunday school class at church…I said some very iffy things to a bunch of old saints (all qualified to teach but unwilling) and the result was some great conversations….One of them got people so riled up we all needed confession. My dad likened it to a bar fight with an alter call.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Great post!!! I love Bruce Cooper’s comment above about the comments section being like a gathering of people sitting around the kitchen table chatting. One person says one thing and another person says something else. Before you know it, all kinds of ideas are being presented. You learn so much from these conversations and you benefit from all the different perspectives.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, it’s a great observation, and so true. The temperament of the comments section is probably set up by the post. It’s fun to see how every writer draws their own unique crowd and then watch how it’s handled by the writer. It is a good thing that it’s hard to work another writers crowd. You do very well around the kitchen table chats Linda

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Like Rush Limbaugh, you put into words a lot of things I have been thinking. Thanks Gary. I have noticed that I miss reading posts from bloggers (like you) that I enjoy because of either the time of day I check in (early – mid-morning) or some sort of strange algorithm from WordPress. Thanks for the challenge.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Pete. I liked Rush. he is quite a few notches above my pay grade. I agree that the comments section of a blog can be a challenge; first getting comments and then interacting in such a way the commenters felt like they added to the conversation and strangers became less strange. I need to get your blog on my e-mail.

      Like

  10. Interesting post, Gary! Like you, I have discontinued reading a blog because there was no interaction: He was an insightful writer, I left comments, then nothing. Interaction is important to me; I think it is for everyone because God is a God of relationships. But people can relate to one another in as many ways as God has facets.
    I read blogs like yours with 35 or 50 or 130 ‘likes,’ and I pray I’m never that popular. It takes a lot of time and careful consideration to respond to comments. (I am more hermit-like than gregarious.)
    You do an awesome job with the gifts God has given you, and I look forward to your posts. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The level of likes and comments does suprise me Kathy. I have less than 500 followers ( I think). I write fewer posts as a result. I read and follow more blogs as a result and am in awe of many much better writers.
      Like you, interaction is important but I have had to narrow down what I do when I sit down behind my old slow lap top.
      Bottom line: people are important; even the ones who give 10 likes in the same minute (I look for those things). By the way, you do come up with some pretty good insights!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Ha! 😅 I look for those things, too.
        Thank you for the kind words, and for the interaction.
        One thing that has surprised me about blogging: the people I have become friends with! I didn’t know, when I started, that that would happen. I’m really looking forward to meeting a lot of you when we get to Heaven! In the meantime, I very much enjoy and appreciate the friendship, virtual (cyber?) though it may be.

        Liked by 2 people

  11. My Mom taught me to be polite. When someone “talks” to you, reply. I appreciate all those out there who take the time to comment on my blog and want them to know it. Thank you, for an insightful post. It gives me something to process and practice better.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s the right thing to do Donna; not only that, it pays off in friendships and deeper discussions. It’s also like putting extra burgers and Brats on the grill and the whole neighborhood just happens to be walking by to say hi…yep, like that.
      I was going to title my post “Make your blog a place to hang out” but it was too long.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. And who would ever think they could make friends this way when we started mercy?
      I am also very pleased with the quality people one can meet and begin to get to know. Quite a bonus after putting ones-self out there.

      Liked by 2 people

  12. Well Gary, you know you reeled me into this post the moment you began a dialogue with Buddy and gave us a “Buddy View” picture. He sure is handsome little guy.

    I’ll be honest, I reluctantly ventured into the blogging sphere only doing so at the strong encouragement of my brother and best friend. I wanted a way to share my lessons with the people I met at the park or on a hike that connected with Adi. Never in my wildest dreams did I imagine how blogging would connect me with brothers and sisters in Christ from around the US and the world, growing in me a love and appreciation for the worldwide body of Christ. One of the many things I look forward to is meeting these kindred spirits like yourself (to use Anne of Green Gables words which I’m currently reading to my girls right now) in heaven one day. Oh, what a reunion that will be. I have also appreciated connecting with seasoned saints such as yourself who have walked with Jesus through the trials and triumphs of life and share the wisdom that’s been gleaned. That said I’ve enjoyed connecting with bloggers who share similar interests who don’t walk with Jesus yet, but I cherish their blog-friendship, cheer on their work, and pray faithfully for their salvation.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ha HA Beth, AI put Buddy into the picture I thought “Beth will get a kick out of a dogs view here. Buddy is our handicapped daughters dog who thinks we are the pets and not him. The kennel where we got him as a pup didn’t know or tell us he has trouble locating sound direction. Quite the personality though. very fun.
      Seriously, I have used your blog as an illustration in to a couple other bloggers about narrowing down their posts to a theme or thread that relates to a specific group of people. You get the dog lovers as well as the insight seekers as well as being personable. A win win win! And you do well in the comments section.
      Oh yes, I’ll be there at the reunion asking if there is trout or bass in the pond.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Gary, I hope Buddy brings your daughter much delight and lots of comfort. It’s funny the quirky things we learn about our dogs as they grow up. Thank you for the extremely kind comments about my blog. I am so blessed by seasoned bloggers like yourself who have set such a good example. I’ll be anticipating a heavenly fish fry one day.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. This is so great Gary! I only started blogging last year, and the WordPress community became new friends that I could still meet while low immunity kept me from normal social activities during chemo. Life is back to ‘normal’ now but I still love connecting with my WordPress friends. I’ve learned so much and appreciate every single person who I follow or who stops by on my posts! In Aussie slang we’re “havin’ a cuppa”. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  14. I am greatful for my blogging journey, Gary. Sometimes, it goes well – other times, not so well. However, the one constant are the comments and feedback along with, what I think, are some very good friendships as a result. There are always interesting exchanges and I try to make sure with my own comments they are relateable and thoughtful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The ups and downs of posts really are understood by anyone who has blogged for awhile Sean, Friends sure help.
      You understand the good workings of a blog if you do well in the comments section.

      Like

    1. It’s like estimating the power of a smile from a stranger on the street Jim, priceless and life changing to one needing a reason to live and still of high value to one who thinks they have everything, yet their day has been cloudy till now.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I replied three times before it finally went and that was only a third of what I wrote. Maybe it was God’s way of saying keep it simple. Yes I believe that was it. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. That’s frustrating Wayne. But yes, simple is good if it works. I’m still amazed tat I can sit here in a wild snowstorm, totally snowed in (as the plow may wait a couple days to go by) and still communicate with people around the globe…even though I have to put on all my snow gear and trudge knee deep in fresh heavy snow to visit my neighbor and see if he is ok…Take care my friend

    Like

  16. Oh Gary, I say wonderful insight and I completely agree, your comments are as insightful, engaging, welcomed, and so appreciated, especially from me, exactly like your writings are.
    I’ve felt so honored to connect with writers through WordPress, especially since writing is very new to me. I’m amazed by what Only God could have done. I began writing thoughts and insights from The Lord, in 2015 at the young age of 55, after hearing in my spirit, use the platform you have. I was completely taken aback. Platform what platform, Lord? Then I realized He wanted me to practice. When I look back at early Facebook posts I cringe. In the presence of writers like you and so many, I still cringe today.

    Most of my life I’ve welcomed accomplished intelligent people and longed to be around them. Proverbs 27:17 was my email quote and mantra.

    Poetry appeared with one poem in 2007, then came in like a flood beginning in 2017 and thus my writing began.

    So from the bottom of my heart I’m very honored you would read my posts, engage and comment. I’m grateful for people like you who know what to say in the midst of hardship, and share your life, with those of us stumbling forward while suffering your own hellish events.

    You’ll never know what this means to me.

    Thank you for sharing your gift and for being a WordPress buddy!

    Blessings, from a very Grateful me!
    Laurette

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Laurette, I am humbled and honored with your words. Thank You.
      You are one of those bloggers that do not disappoint with your posts. You have keen insights and have a way of delivering them that allows me, the reader, to see that truth through my life and situation. Truth is like that but it’s a gift to deliver it without a lot of baggage that I often see in and around the periphery of many posts. God will send to you those who need what you give out.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Gary, for so many reasons I appreciate this post. And Buddy! He melts the snow around him with his cuteness ;-). When I began blogging it was because I felt lost in my “purpose” of life. After a major health crisis put me out of the school (all I had known my entire life plus 23 years) I floundered (I knew you could relate to “flounder” lol). I fell flat on my faith! And I found a community of friends that I now call family. Although my life is busy with other things and I fail to read as much as I want, I try VERY HARD to connect and comment to EVERYONE! I’m old-fashioned that way, you know, like when we used to have real conversations in life? 🙂 I’m happy to know you and be a part of this blogging community with you. You have the snow, swimsuits are on display here, 40 mph winds and a 30 degree drop in temps tonight, just keep me wondering what season I’m actually in! Take care, Gary, and God bless you and yours!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Well Karla, I read the first part of your comment to Buddy and he responded like he needed a treat after that, yep, that’s our Buddy. This morning the snow was too deep for him so he tried with all his might to burrow along the ground under it. I need to carry the video camera.
      I think you connect well with quite a diverse audience. You have what I would call a vivacious flavor to your posts;
      that’s a rare and a good thing.
      You are right about having a Word Press family. I would go so far as to say it’s not nearly as dysfunctional as many families or whole communities. We could probably even be in close quarters on an island and enjoy it…OK maybe a stretch as I like my space.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Gary, thank you for your kind and thoughtful response. It has been a goal of mine to connect to a diverse audience; thank you for that affirmation. And the flavor of my posts~that’s so kind, too! I giggled and agreed that my WP family is less dysfunctional. We’re an electrician group that can communicate. There you go! Like you, I like my space, but an island with like minded people sounds like a great future escape plan! Buddy, Finley says hello! Take care, Gary. God bless you and yours!

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Your heart is my heart when it comes to commenting on blogs. Whether on others or my own, I appreciate the interaction with others! I love your mind, photographs and heart for Jesus! Buddy is so adorable!!!!! Thank you Gary for your authenticity!!!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. We are blessed to have 12 baskets full of friends we have never met Mandy…That interaction is no less than a great thing. You do so well interacting with so many, I see you name in the comment section on many peoples blogs. You are a good trailblazer in that neck of the woods. Thank you for putting yourself out there. Ya, buddy has learned to bat his eyes.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank You. I am glad you are an encourager, we all need it. I see you were in new tribes mission work…I knew people who were associated from a long time ago. A good mission.

      Like

  19. Shalom, Gary! 🙂 Great post and photos. 🙂 I always appreciate that it’s like you’re talking with your readers, not at. That’s the style I like for the blogs I enjoy the most. Thank you. 🙂
    I want to honor Yeshua, make friends, and help.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank You Chaya. I believe you are on your way with your posts. Personal experiences, telling stories and analogies help a writer come alongside the reader. Enjoy your journey as a writer Chaya. I think I learned more about connecting as a writer in others comments section than in actually posting my blogs.

      Like

  20. When I experienced these spiritual attacks, I also experienced stigma and shame plus a lot of ignorance “offline”, so I started my blog to write about these things and other things nobody openly talks about – like witchcraft and demons and satanism…

    

It had helped me to find articles on the internet when I myself did not have the courage to talk about them, and I am now hoping it will help others when they are in deep despair and are doing research on the internet to find some answers…
    
I hope it will help them understand that it is not their fault and that there is help, that JESUS can help them!

    
In the beginning, when I started blogging, I kept myself completely anonymous on my blog – as I did in real life concerning the stuff I was going through… and for a very long time, I have lived a “double life” of some sort, there are still very, very few people I talk to about what happened to me…at a church event, I once told a woman a little bit about it, and she was too shocked and never spoke to me again, so I am still learning how to word these things and how to discern what the correct “dose” (of horror) is for someone to hear…



    Putting a picture of myself up and connecting to people and speaking to them through their comments on my blog and through commenting on theirs is a first step for me to come out and live openly WITH my story…

    

So today, I wanted to not “ride off into the sunset without saying a word”, what I often do, but to say thank you, because you, my friend, are one of the people whom I connected with who do know and understand (at least to a large degree) what I went through and still want to talk and interact with me – that’s very encouraging and healing and doing it online and separated from my “real offline life” is a first step and a bridge to doing it more and more in all areas of my life – so it means a lot and I am learning and healing through it!


    Besides, I also learn a lot from you and your views and I am so glad I came across you and your blog!


    Last, but not least, I wanted to virtually visit y’all in the middle of the snow and say “hi” to Buddy and throw him a few treats into the snow on the patio and watch him dig for them… fun times

    Very inspiring and precious article, my brother – as always!


    GOD bless you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Eva. Many things about your story over time inspires me. The person who you are today did not get there haphazardly. You have a personal story of the power of a real God in your life. Your belief didn’t change you…God did and is doing.
      As far as a virtual treat for Buddy, I explained it in over-exaggerated and animated terms to Buddy and there is a disconnect somewhere in little Buddy. We always knew he was destine for less than our aspirations of him (like most parents with their children in sports).

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That does surprise me though, Gary, I would have expected buddy to understand…

        I thought I had seen the same spiritual depth in his eyes that I used to see in my dog’s…

        His name was Paul (which already hinted a bit towards his hidden “humanness”) – he was a Golden Retriever and he lived with me during the times when I was a therapist and also did trainings and a lot of traveling – Paul was always with me…

        In therapy sessions, for instance, he would lie next to me until the client was about to become emotional, as they were touching on some difficult topic and just before they were about to cry, even before I noticed it, he did, and got up and lay down next to the client for emotional support – it was very touching to see, he was a great encourager and a clown and he understood everything I ever said to him…

        And did I mention before that his dad was a movie star?
        The breeders were journalists and Paul, who truly had a very fancy and aristocratic name, like purebred dogs do, once saw his dad on TV! His dad actually played the dog of a famous celebrity in a film about their life – the breeders had told me in which film his dad had starred, and the film was on the telly one day and I said to Paul “look, there’s your dad!” and I swear he understood!

        For a while, we went to do some training in a police dog school, me, I hated it, the people there were “up a completely different alley” than I was and the trainer was in my opinion awful, but Paul, he literally begged me to go there again and again, even when we passed by the training ground, which was close to “our forest”, he kept reminding me to book the session for the coming week – I think he would have rather been a police dog than a therapy dog – so much to parents’ ideas for careers or aspirations of their children…

        However, now that I thought about it a bit deeper, I don’t think Paul would have appreciated a virtual treat either, so please tell Buddy I am sorry and perhaps give him a real treat on my behalf and tell him it’s from his aunty Eva in London?

        Liked by 1 person

    2. Now that would have been an experience to have a dog like that Eva. Buddy is still budding as he just turned one and his stomach and anything blowing in the wind short circuits his thoughts and actions. We think he was mistreated in very young puppy stage on something accidental affected his hearing as he cannot tell which direction sounds come from.
      Take care Eva, I practice my speaking engagements on Buddy so something might catch??

      Liked by 1 person

  21. First, Buddy is adorable!!! Second, I love how you engage with others. You make this virtual space become more personal. And it’s obvious that you care about people in general. You are always inspiring and encouraging!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Stephanie and Buddy says “I know right?”
      I do find myself caring about people I have never met and saying to myself “that is odd”. I don’t think it works to just act like one cares. I have to call it a positive side effect of walking with Jesus for over 50 years and something I shouldn’t take credit for at whatever sliding scale I have on caring….I probably fall way short of dying for people I don’t know though.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. What am I hoping to gain by posting my articles? That is a very good question. I hope that the Lord will use me to encourage others or to perhaps bring a greater understanding of their walk with God. I am so blessed when someone says my post helped them. I didn’t know when I started out that I would make good friends around the world. That has been a wonderful blessing to me. I agree with what others have said about how great it will be when all of us meet each other in Heaven. Thanks for making me think more about the comments section! Blessings, Gary!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Cindy. This is something I review once in awhile and ask myself hard questions. The good friends around the world are quite a gift, it challenges me to attempt be a good friend, even to those who might not have online friendship skills.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It is quite amazing how many comments you get on your posts. I hope to develop those “online friendship skills”, too. I am more of a listener than a talker. Maybe I need to work on that. Your post has given me some things to think about. Blessings, Gary!

        Liked by 1 person

  23. I think the post sets the stage for people hanging out in comments Cindy. As far as creating that, I haven’t good answers in breaking down how to write that way. I suspect I have developed my communication skills to be quite open ended as I worked with teenagers for 10 years and developed their confidence and dveloped leadership in them (my gifted area). I also hone my communication and friendship skills waiting in lines at stores. I look for ways to open conversations naturally and not obvious. On a hot day (for example) I might comment to someone with kids that this weather makes me want to build the ultimate pool with a slip slid into it and a small waterfall to stand under it…If the adult doesn’t respond the kids jump all over it and it creates kid adult conversation way beyond me. If someone is wearing hunt or fish clothing we have lots to talk about. Lastly, I sort of write like I talk, only with a little more thought, so they tell me.

    Like

  24. Well said! I love some of the conversations I get into and the people I meet because of blogging. Some of them have become friends after years of talking back and forth on each other’s writing. It’s wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. What a great post Gary!! Awesome pics as well.

    The comments section is one of my favorite places to catch up..it’s where fellowship has the opportunity to blossom. Friendships across the globe transpire. Beautiful blessings.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s a challenging aspect to posting Alicia. Risky if we try to be funny because we may offend and conversation fades with easy and pat answers. I have seen many comments sections that fel the authors answers to comments are from a cut and paste menu. I tend to live on the edge and after awhile if people survive my comments they begin to see me for me. You do well with your comment section comments because you care about people and value their relationship.
      I do like the farmhouse look of your new kitchen. I don’t dare show my wife that picture,

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yup I definitely agree with you on the topic of the comment section!! It’s a great way to know our blogging community better, I think of the people here as my friends. It’s such a blessing!

        …And hey you could show your wife my kitchen pictures, maybe it would get the two of you started on a project together and then it gives you new blogging content too!!😉

        Liked by 1 person

  26. Sigh. I did show my wife. Now she wants it in the cabin I’m building for guests. It’s a little cabin in the woods about 40 yards into the woods off our yard. We haven’t decided how rustic to make it yet. Me: very rustic and an adventurous place to bunk. She: a nice place to stay.

    Like

    1. Thank you Crissy. My philosophy instructor in college called me “one of a kind’ as well. I suspect you mean different things. Isn’t it great to have such a diverse group of people as “friends” who all love God and people as a common ground and display it in so many different ways…maybe a rainbow to God. And there’s Buddy. He want’s to be cloned so he can catch every leaf blowing in the wind, One is not enough. He meets himself coming and going. Wish I had that energy.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. There’s a place where all our stories will be told Fred (sadly a place where they wont, but not for us). Someday keeps getting sooner and we will get to hear all of each others stories.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: