Fishing and making fishermen

Loon hiding near her nest

Yesterday three of us searched for some monster crappies where they should have been but I guess that’s why they call it fishing…No crappies in the shallows because the cold front took them back out again. The little pike were not shy about eating our crappie lures, and there were a few bass not willing to let hooks near their beds.

Nice bass Chris

It was quite a contrast from my last weeks fishing experience with my grand-kids in Kentucky. The girls Liz (9) and Nique (7) can both cast and reel in their lines. Liz can avoid the logs and rocks for the most part and Nique seems to catch them all. The learning curve is there and they both love fishing.

Then there is Aron (2). Yes I took him on his first fishing adventure. I did it right with pop and gummy bears. I would have taken one of Americas funniest pictures, but My camera, Aron, me, and my , reel, and tackle were so tangled with line and a small hook and bobber that I couldn’t get to the camera. I thought I had a good system planned with a two year old. I was wrong!

I had this mental image of a small boy sitting patiently beside grandpa watching a couple of bobbers and maybe catching some bluegill or hybrid bass swimming by.

Reality was quick as Aron grabbed any rod available and started reeling and flailing the end of the rod like a sword. It was closest to fly-casting while doing some karate moves while swinging at a panicking frog in the grass. The small tree nearby quickly acquired line and lost all it’s spring growth of leaves and a few branches. I rushed to the rescue and ended up in the same shape as the tree looking for my glasses in the shallow waters edge while taking the end of the bobber out of my ear.

After retying a new hook on and wadding up the first half of what was my on my reel spool, I calmly put the bobber back on and cast out again. “Can you just watch the bobber and not reel in the line?” I asked Aron. “Uhhh-ha” was the answer. “Can you hold the rod stil and not wave it around?” I asked. “Uh-ha” came too quickly. I figure the hook lasted four seconds longer. This time I saved the rest of the tree and the frog was long gone.There were more than a few chuckles down the bank a ways as some older gentlemen sat on buckets with surf-casting rods out for stripped bass. We also drew the attention of a turtle that Aron wanted to go after in the deeper water. I held him back with another package of gummy bears.

Lone Swan at the end of the lake "I like Me and my space...leave me alone!"

I later reflected on how it must be hard to be two and want to fish. In Aron’s mind he was fishing and doing it right. It seems that no matter what age we are and what level we find ourselves at, we know what we are doing; just ask us! It shall take some years and many times fishing to give Aron his own rod. After all he is only two. Meanwhile I have a list of things to replace before fishing from the bank again. If you see a robin with half his feathers gone or a bobber at the top of a tree in the middle of no-where, I may have the inside scoop for you.

I also wonder how many of us are two when it comes to being “Fishers of Men”. If you would call yourself a “follower of Jesus” He has called us to that adventure as well. Read about it in Matthew 4:19

Make some comments at the bottom under “Reply” about your fishing skills or being a fisher of men, Are all followers of Jesus called to be “fishers of men “?  Is it only for the mature and talented? Are there a lot of Two year olds going on 50?

Gary

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About Gary Fultz

Outdoors Man, Hunter, Fisherman, Guide, Writer / Author, Photographer, Public Speaker, Musician, Song Writer, Story Teller, Follower Of Jesus, Peragon.com day job.
This entry was posted in adventure, Build Faith, devotional thoughts, fishing adventure, Gary Fultz Blog, listening to God, outdoor adventure, outdoor spiritual truths, purpose in life, relationship with God, spiritual adventure, story telling. and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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